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At Anglesey, we are a vibrant and nurturing school community, where children are given the skills to become , inquisitive, resilient, independent learners. Our curriculum provides a range of creative, challenging and inspiring experiences for all. This equips our children with the life skills to be happy, flourish and be successful...Today, tomorrow and in the future

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Writing tasks

Writing

Monday 15th June 2020:

Click on the link to watch a short animation called Lighthouse:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

Grab a piece of paper and a pen and start jotting down information about this short film. Please use the 5 Ws to record your ideas – what happened? Why did it happen? Who are the characters? Where is it set? When is it set?

 

Later in the week, you’ll be writing a news report on the events. Think back to when we did the report writing work on the floods in Bewdley to help you with this new unit of work. Why do you think the events in the Lighthouse film would be newsworthy?

 

Below, you’ll see examples of headlines and types of headlines. Can you match them up?

 

Examples of headlines:

  1. Community steps up to help lighthouse keeper
  2. De-light-fuelled ending for lighthouse keeper
  3. Boat bypasses boulders because of rapid response by residents
  4. FRIGHT IN THE NIGHT WITH NO LIGHT
  5. Boat avoids peril when lighthouse lantern smashes
  6. SAVED!

 

Headline Types:

  1. Alliteration

The repetition of the same consonant or sound at the beginning of two or more words in a sentence

 

  1. Pun

A play on words which have the same sounds but different meanings (homonyms)

 

  1. Rhyme

The repetition of similar sounding words

 

  1. Single word

One word which sums up the article

 

  1. Straight to the point

A short description to explain what has happened and attract the reader

 

  1. Letter play

Where words are changed by subtle letter swaps to humorously support the story in the article

 

Now that you have matched the headlines, I would like you to write your own headline, byline and lead paragraph.

 

Headline

This should include or summarise the main points of the news story. Headlines are written to grab the attention of the reader.

Byline

The name, job title or position and location of the journalist.

Lead paragraph

This is only one paragraph. It is basically a short synopsis of the event(s). The easiest way to do this is to use the 5W’s: Who, What, When, Where, Why. ‘How’ can also be considered as a W.

 

Tuesday 16th June 2020:

Today you will be interviewing key characters who encountered the lighthouse events, recording their responses, reminding yourselves how to write using directed speech and then selecting the most interesting bits of information from the eye witnesses that you could then keep safe to use later in your report.

 

Firstly, let’s think about the characters from Lighthouse (the short film you watched yesterday).

  1. Lighthouse keeper
  2. Villagers
  3. Ship’s crew

Watch the short film again and write down as much information about these characters as you can. There may not be that much obvious information for you to simply retrieve so please remember to use your inference skills.

Click on this link to watch the film https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

and make sure you have a pen and paper ready to start making notes about the characters.

 

Next, you are going to pretend you are interviewing the people involved with the near lighthouse disaster!

  • Organise your work so that you have space for your interview with the lighthouse keeper, space for your interview with the villagers and space for your interview with the ship’s crew.
  • Write down the questions you want to ask and what their responses would be. Think about the questions you ask – use the 5Ws and H for how to help you, for example, why do you think the light went out? How did this make you feel?
  • Use open questions rather than closed questions as this will give you a more interesting answer. For example, if you ask “were you scared?” this would be a closed question that generates a fairly boring answer where as if you ask “how did you feel?” this is an open question and the reply will be more detailed and interesting as they can talk about their emotions and what was going through their mind.

 

Now you’ll look at some examples of directed speechTHESE ARE NOT EXAMPLES TO BE USED WITH YOUR LIGHTHOUSE REPORT! These examples are just to show you how to punctuate speech and have nothing to do with the lighthouse story. Please copy them out and highlight or underline the punctuation.

 

  1. ‘The whole experience was terrifying!’ recalls Piggy Number Two, the victim in this heinous crime. ‘I hope a guilty verdict is returned and that the Big Bad Wolf receives a lengthy prison sentence.’

 

  1. A spokesperson for the King’s men said, ‘We were asked to attend an accident at the castle wall, whereby Mr Dumpty appeared to have fallen from a considerable height. We arrived shortly after the incident, though we were unable to put him back together again.’

 

  1. ‘I did see a young lady entering the property,’ an eyewitness told us, ‘though I believed she must have known the three bears and so I decided not to challenge her.’

 

  1. ‘Potter’s broomstick collided with the end of an opposing player and he fell quite heavily onto the floor of the stadium. The medical team were dispatched and he is now recovering in the hospital wing,’ explained Albus Dumbledore, headmaster at Hogwarts.

 

  1. A member of the crowd described the sighting, ‘I looked up and could see something flying towards us. We thought it was a bird or a plane at first, though as it came closer we realised it was a man in a cape and a blue and red outfit. He flew overhead and down towards the burning building!’

 

  1. ‘I awoke and noticed that it was very dark outside, but when I got to the window I realised that it was because of the huge beanstalk that was blocking the daylight!’ Jack’s mother reported.

 

Last of all, pick your favourite eye witness accounts from your interviews. By this I mean look at the questions you pretended to ask the key characters (lighthouse keeper, villagers, ship’s crew) and the answers that you wrote down as their responses.

 

Keep ONLY the most interesting ones. If you don’t think they’re interesting then make them interesting. Use the writing techniques we’ve practised throughout the year.

 

Once you’ve picked your favourites, write them up as they’d appear in your report. Look at the examples above of how to report directed speech – this will give you an idea of how to write eye witness accounts into a news report.

 

Wednesday 17th June 2020:

Today we will look at the difference between informal and formal language as using formal language will be required to write your newspaper report.

Look at the two sentences below. Which is formal and which is informal?

 

  1. Due to unforeseen circumstances, tonight’s performance will be cancelled.
  2. We’re having a bit of trouble with snow so the school’s going to be shut today.

 

Click on the link below to find out more about formal and informal language –

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdKYl8Tg_FQ

 

Here is a list of formal and informal sentence starters. Please complete them in the same style.

 

Formal

He requested

The incident occurred

They received

For several reasons

The police were unable

Prices increased

The room was in complete disarray

The roof collapsed suddenly

It has been brought to our attention

It would have prevented

 

Informal

He asked

The thing happened

They got

For lots of reasons

The police couldn’t

Prices went up

The room was really messy

The roof caved in fast

We’ve been told

It would’ve stopped

The council said they’d move it

He went down with the flu

She wouldn’t shut up

They were really sorry

 

Last of all, thinking about what you’ve learnt about formal and informal language today, use Google to search for examples of FORMAL LANGUAGE being used in news reports.

Write then down and label what features are being used, for example, higher vocabulary and complex sentences.

 

Thursday 18th June 2020:

Watch Lighthouse again - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

 

  1. Write a list of factual events that happened throughout the story. Remember – you will be writing a newspaper not a story so stick to the facts.
  2. Annotate (or label) the list of events with the 5Ws and How. This is important to ensure you don’t miss information.
  3. Have you used enough detail? Will your notes help you to write a report? Will this report of yours give the reader enough information about the events that happened that night with the lighthouse?

 

Below is some information on how to use numbers in report writing – read through it and see if you need to edit your notes.

 

Numbers in Journalism

 

On the whole words are used for numbers which are single figure and digits are used for anything above nine. Unless you are writing a measurement or a percentage, then you should always use digits. However, you should never start a sentence with digits. E.g. Three, Six, 12, 17, 4kg, 2%

 

Try to always abbreviate measurements with the exception of miles.

 

Millions and Billions are always spelled out, except in currency.

 

Always use the 24-hour clock and use a colon.

E.g. 13:45, 21:20

 

Decades should be written 1980s, 2000s.

 

When writing dates, put the day before the month and don’t use dd/mm/yy. E.g. 13 May 2016 – don’t say 13th

 

If being used as an adjective or a noun, then an age should be hyphenated. E.g. The 13-year-old boy or The books for six-year-olds.

 

When using an age after a name it should be included with commas. E.g. Mrs Gwen Taylor, 45, was the driver of the vehicle.

 

For the rest of the lesson you will write your report.

You should have:

  • Written your headline, byline and lead paragraph on Monday.
  • Drafted out some eye witness accounts on Tuesday to use in your report.
  • Learnt about how to use formal language in report writing yesterday.
  • Today, learnt about how to organise events, report key information and use numbers in report writing.

 

As you write your report, please make sure that you refer back to what you’ve done already and read through what you’ve written. It is very important that you take the time to edit because otherwise mistakes with spelling, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation will be missed.

 

Friday 19th June 2020:

Watch the short film again (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo)

and make a note of as many prepositional phrases as you can e.g. on the clifftop, above the village, inside the houses.

 

Follow this link if you’re unsure about prepositions: https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-are-prepositions

 

Finish off your newspaper report about the lighthouse events and make sure that, after you’ve checked your work, you write it up in your best handwriting.

 

As you edit your report, please include some of the prepositional phrases that you thought of today.

 

Also, you’ll need to finish your article with a footer which should bring the article up to date with what things are like today. Because of this, the footer will need to be written in present tense. For example, today the lighthouse keeper has a team supporting him with the upkeep of the lighthouse and the villagers are proud of their community spirit.

 

Follow this link to find out about how powerful vocabulary can improve your writing - https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-word-bank

 

Monday 22nd June 2020:

 

Play the clip and stop at 0m40s - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

 

Our writing this week will be a mixed first-person/third person narrative. Therefore we will include many references to the character’s emotions and thoughts about the incident. To open we are going to try to set the scene and introduce our character.

On a piece of paper, make two columns – label the first column with The Lighthouse Keeper and the second column with The Setting. You now need to add information, which you know already, about the character. You also need to look out for setting information in the first seconds of the animation. E.g. full moon, cloudy, waves were gathering.

 

Look at this opening – Highlight or underline where there is information about the man and information about the setting.

 

I recall an old fisherman’s rhyme told to me by my father when I was just a lad, ‘If clouds are gathering thick and fast, keep sharp look-out for sail and mast. If the wind is blowing in the north, no fisherman should dare set forth.’ He’d been a fisherman since he was old enough to cast a net and had always believed it to be true, refusing to launch his boat if a north wind was blowing, much to my mother’s annoyance. However, I realise now, some forty years later, that perhaps there was some truth in his theory. Because it was an icy north wind that blew on that fateful night in December: a night I won’t forget in a hurry. Heavy, ragged clouds obscured the moon from time to time in a tumultuous grip and the sea was a restless beast, chewing at the rocks below the lighthouse. I watched the horizon for longer than usual, scouring the inky darkness for ships with my father’s rhyme playing over and over in my mind and then eventually I decided to retire to my books.

 

Write an opening paragraph which puts information about the lighthouse keeper and the setting together. You can also include information about his past – USE YOUR IMAGINATION!

Tips:

  1. Look back at the notes you made at the start of the lesson.
  2. Look at the example opening for inspiration.
  3. Play the animation to remind yourself.
  4. Use first person and third person narrative.
  5. Be descriptive – use words to describe feelings, weather, setting, etc…
  6. Use powerful vocabulary.
  7. Use a variety of interesting sentences starters and extend to create complex sentences.
  8. Take care with spellings, punctuation and grammar.
  9. If in doubt, use online tools to help you. For example, Google an online dictionary or thesaurus and search for examples of things you may be unsure about.

 

Tuesday 23rd June 2020:

 

Watch Lighthouse until the point where the candle goes out. (Up to 56 seconds)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

  1. What does the lighthouse keeper feel about the people outside?
  2. What makes them think this?
  3. Why is this in the clip?
  4. How does it make us feel about the man and the cheering people?
  5. What time of year could it be? (perhaps New Year or Christmas).

 

Look at images of the village at night. (Pause the animation around 24-30 seconds.) Make any notes which you feel are important about the setting.

Complete a 4,3,2,1 of ideas – ONLY DESCRIBE THE VILLAGE SETTING FOR NOW.

  • Write 4 expanded noun phrases,
  • 3 preposition phrases,
  • 2 short snappy sentences
  • 1 sentence including a subordinating clause.

 

Below are some ideas to help you but PLEASE DO NOT COPY THEM. I expect you to create your own sentences –

 

4 Expanded noun phrases

  • Bare, sinuous trees awaited their springtime leaves.
  • Amber lights shone from friendly windows and inside noisy revellers danced and cheered.
  • The narrow walkways and paths were bathed in the pale light of a milky moon.
  • Houses of all sizes dotted the grassy clifftop.

 

3 Preposition phrases

  • High above the village, at the edge of the cliff, sat the Briar’s Rock lighthouse.
  • The light danced over the rooftop; the darkness was no match for its strength.
  • Beyond the cliffs, the restless sea gurgled and churned.

 

2 Short snappy sentences (no more than 4 words)

  • Light swept the village.
  • The villagers cheered.

 

1 Sentence including a subordinating clause

  • The lighthouse, which didn’t benefit from the same warm glow of the beam, stood stoically in the near darkness.

 

For the rest of the lesson please put all your ideas together to create a setting description of the village.

Think about the sentences we have been working on today and all the techniques that we use in writing at school to enable you to write a high quality description.

 

Wednesday 24th June 2020:

 

Look at the short section of film between 0.44 sec and 1 minute.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

 

This is where we will go back to our first-person narrative again. This will be a simple series of steps. As you watch the clip write down what happens in sequence/order. For example, in first person narrative (the lighthouse keeper’s voice) it would be: I was working at a table… etc.

 

Look at the example below and think about the openers and sentence lengths.

 

High above the village, at the edge of the cliff, sat the Briar’s Rock lighthouse. Its bright light danced over the rooftops and out to sea; the darkness was no match for its strength. In the village, the narrow walkways and paths were bathed in the pale light of a milky moon and bare, sinuous trees awaited their springtime leaves. Amber lights shone from friendly windows and inside noisy revellers danced and applauded. Houses of all sizes dotted the grassy clifftop and beyond the cliffs and the pretty little village, the restless sea gurgled and churned Light swept the village. The villagers cheered. Light swept the village. More applause. The lighthouse, which didn’t benefit from the same warm glow of the beam, or the same cheeriness of the village, stood stoically watching in the near darkness. I was working at a table in my living quarters in the tower. Distracted by the noise of the repeated cheering, I attempted to block out the sound by closing the only open window. Suddenly, above me, I heard an unexpected grinding and then a loud clank, followed by darkness. The beam stopped turning. The villagers ceased cheering. The window blew open and extinguished my candle: almost as though it were in harmony with the light.

 

Edit and improve these sentences below –

 

I was working at a table.

The sound distracted me.

I shut the window.

The light went out.

Now write these in a sequenced paragraph. You should include other details such as the candle blowing out, the villagers stopping their cheers and sound from the top of the lighthouse. Think about your openings. Are they interesting enough? Are you using a good variety?

 

Now continue by watching the animation again where the lighthouse keeper reaches the top of the lighthouse. Write your next paragraph.

Think about:

  1. Sentence openers
  2. Sentence length
  3. Interesting vocabulary
  4. Descriptive language
  5. Detail – don’t leave bits out

 

Here is a useful word bank:

stood

ignited

malfunctioned

arose

ascended

investigated

Got to my feet

scaled

considered

stumble

scrambled

explored

tumble

ran

examined

tripped

clambered

grabbed

staggered

ceased

gripped

lurched

halted

seized

hesitated

frozen

snatched

lit

stopped

grasped

 

Thursday 25th June 2020:

Watch the 10 seconds between 1m36s and 1m46s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

Create a descriptive sentence to explain that the boat was approaching.

 

Watch the animation from 1m36s until the point where the lighthouse keeper throws open the door. To begin, write a short first person account of what the lighthouse keeper does up to the point where the dome smashes.

Use the following:

 

I INSPECTED THE LANTERN

 

I HEARD A SHIP

 

THE GLASS COVERING WAS BROKEN

 

Write other sentences which would mean the same thing.

 

Below are examples of how you can add detail to these sentences:

 

I inspected the lantern.

I examined the glass dome.

I scrutinised the interior of the light.

I studied the internal workings of the light to assess the damage.

 

I heard a ship.

I made out the sound of a ship approaching.

The sound of a ship’s horn grew closer.

A ship signalled its approach with a long, loud horn and alerted me to the imminent danger it faced.

 

The glass covering was broken.

The glass lay on the floor in a hundred pieces.

Shards of glass lay scattered around me.

The glass dome shattered immediately upon impact with the floor.

 

Use these examples to edit your own sentence ideas.

 

Now put your ideas together into a paragraph to create a descriptive sentence to explain that the boat was approaching.

 

Friday 26th June 2020:

 

Construct a paragraph about the lighthouse keeper’s feelings. Include a repetition of a comparative adjective? Faster and faster, closer and closer, nearer and nearer?

 

Do you remember what ‘show, not tell’ means?

Let’s think about panic. What does panic look like?

Look at the examples below:

 

1) The horn sounded again. It was getting closer. I sat on the floor, trying find a solution inside my foggy mind. Waves beneath me crashed endlessly. My tie felt as if it were choking me. I took quick, shallow breaths. In the brief seconds which passed, I glanced out to the village and realised my only hope lay at the bottom of two hundred and fifty three steps.

 

2) The boat neared the lighthouse and I could hear the sound of the horn blaring through the pitch-black night. The sound of the roaring engine churned over and over and I could tell that, at the speed they were travelling at, they would reach the perilous rocks in around ten minutes. I sat on the cold metal of the lighthouse floor, trying to find a solution inside my foggy mind as to how I would stop the boat from approaching. The clothes around my neck felt restrictive and it felt almost as though my tie was attempting to choke me. Therefore, my breathing was difficult and I took quick, sharp, shallow breaths while I considered my options. Several seconds passed and I looked to the left of me down to the village at the bottom of the lighthouse and realised that my only hope lay at the bottom of two hundred and fifty three steps.

 

Can you underline or highlight examples of show, not tell?

 

Which is more successful at conveying the sense of urgency?  

The longer example certainly contains some successful descriptions, however the shorter version actually coveys the urgency and tension of the situation. In this case, less is more.

 

Create your own paragraph now. Describe the character’s feelings and convey the sense of panic.

Watch the animation from 2m03s to the end.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HfBbSUORvo

 

We will return to third person for the final part of the lesson.

 

Watch the animation again and on a separate piece of paper note down everything which happens, include information that the we don’t see but which must have happened - e.g. he got to his feet, he went back up the lighthouse.

 

Look at the example text:

I was inspecting the inside of the lantern cover and became side-tracked by a sound outside. Peering over the rim of the heavy glass door, it became apparent that the situation had worsened. The sound was a ship…and the ship was approaching. Time was of the essence. Whilst heaving the weighty covering from its position, I stumbled over my toolbox and tumbled backwards to the ground. CRASH! The huge glass dome, which covered the inner-workings of the light, lay in pieces on the floor of the lighthouse. A feeling of helplessness hovered in the air and hope lay shattered alongside the glass casing. His heart pounded faster and faster until the drumming in his ears was unbearable and he felt suddenly very sick. The horn sounded again. It was getting so close. I sat on the floor, trying find a solution inside my foggy mind. The waves beneath me crashed endlessly. My tie felt as if it were choking me. I took quick, shallow breaths. In the brief seconds which passed, I glanced out to the village and realised my only hope lay at the bottom of two hundred and fifty three steps. Awkwardly scrambling to his feet, he darted for the door. The spiral staircase seemed endless, and with every step the lighthouse keeper’s fears about the boat seemed to increase. Finally, the door was in sight. He ran, gasping, towards the exit. As he flung the door open, the sight which befell him was enough to make him stop. Momentarily, he stared. Walking towards him, with lanterns blazing and torches at the ready, were the inhabitants of nearly the entire village. Their smiles illuminated the pathway almost as much as the lights they carried. The journey back up the tower was one of optimism, and with every step he felt encouraged that all was not lost. After guiding the first group of villagers to the top of the lighthouse, with their lights and lanterns shining brightly in the darkness, the lighthouse keeper watched as others gathered in swathes along the clifftop. He watched as the ship safely navigated the rocks. He watched as strangers stood shoulder to shoulder with him and he watched knowing those strangers would soon be friends.

 

What do you think about the openers? Which ones do you like and why?

Which of our writing techniques are used here?

Could we have used a preposition or a simile or rhetorical question?

 

Complete your final paragraph by following the events in chronological order.

You can read the example text again for inspiration but please create your own final paragraph.

 

Once you have finished, read through your Lighthouse narrative from start to finish.

  • Does it make sense?
  • Have you followed the same chronological order as the animated film?
  • Have you muddled up the order of some events?
  • Have you included all the detail and description you need?
  • Do you need to correct any spellings or punctuation?
  • Have you used interesting sentence starters?
  • Have you used interesting sentence types?
  • Have you used writing techniques? Like, show, not tell, powerful vocabulary, etc?

 

Monday 29th June 2020:

 

Let’s start the week with a bit of grammar revision.

Click on the link to find out and subordinating conjuctions:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zqk37p3

 

Use the acronym I SAW A WABUB to help you remember 9 common subordinating conjunctions.

If

 

Since

As

When

 

Although

 

While

After

Before

Until

Because

 

Use subordinating conjunctions in different positions within your sentences.

For example,

  1. I went to bed because I had a headache.
  2. Because I had a headache, I went to bed.

 

In your best handwriting, write about your time at home since school closed. As you write, make sure you use a lots of different subordinating conjunctions and think about the structure of your sentences.

 

Tuesday 30th June 2020:

Over the next few weeks you will be making an information booklet all about earthquakes and volcanoes.

 

You will need:

  1. Scrap paper for notes and rough drafts.
  2. Lined paper and plain paper for your final and neat copies.
  3. A stapler or sticky tape to join the pages of your booklet together.
  4. Pens for writing and pencils/colours for drawing diagrams, pictures and your booklet’s front cover.

 

To begin, click on the link below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z849q6f/articles/zd9cxyc

You will now make notes on what this webpage teaches you about volcanoes. To do this you must –

  • Watch the first video clip then watch it a few times more times whilst making notes at the same time. You can pause it while you finish a note that you’re writing.
  • Read the text underneath the first video and write the definitions of the words that are in bold.

For example, magma is molten rock.

The definitions for these words, which are written in bold letters, might already be on the webpage for you to copy or you may need to find the definition by watching the first video clip again or googling the definition by finding an online dictionary.

  • Next, watch the second video clip (you’ll need to scroll down to the bottom of this page – just follow the link I gave you at the start. It is all there.) The second video shows you real life volcanic activity.
  • Finally, take the test at the end and add more information to your notes. KEEP THESE NOTES SAFE – THEY WILL HELP YOU TO WRITE ABOUT VOLCANOES IN YOUR BOOKLET!

 

Wednesday 1st July 2020:

 

Read your notes from yesterday and write up a draft copy all about volcanoes. When you’re happy that you’ve included as much information as you can, then write this up neatly. Remember to keep this page safe as it will be part of your booklet that you are making.

 

Click on the link below:

http://www.kelsall.cheshire.sch.uk/serve_file/94451

When you write up your neat copy you must edit your work and include a variety of sentence types. This link will remind you of the sentence types we practised at school.

 

Thursday 2nd July 2020:

 

Today you will research earthquakes and, in exactly the same way as Monday, you’ll need to make notes on this.

 

Click on the following link:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z849q6f/articles/zj89t39

 

You will now make notes on what this webpage teaches you about earhtquakes. To do this you must –

  • Watch the first video clip then watch it a few times more times whilst making notes at the same time. You can pause it while you finish a note that you’re writing.
  • Read the text underneath the first video and write the definitions of the words that are in bold.

For example, core – centre of the Earth, mainly metal.  

The definitions for these words, which are written in bold letters, might already be on the webpage for you to copy or you may need to find the definition by watching the first video clip again or googling the definition by finding an online dictionary.

  • Next, make any additional notes about earthquakes by reading the webpage carefully.
  • Finally, take the test at the end and add more information to your notes. KEEP THESE NOTES SAFE – THEY WILL HELP YOU TO WRITE ABOUT VOLCANOES IN YOUR BOOKLET!

 

Friday 3rd July 2020:

Read your notes from yesterday and write up a draft copy all about earthquakes. When you’re happy that you’ve included as much information as you can, then write this up neatly. Remember to keep this page safe as it will be part of your booklet that you are making.

 

Click on the link below:

http://www.kelsall.cheshire.sch.uk/serve_file/94451

When you write up your neat copy you must edit your work and include a variety of sentence types. This link will remind you of the sentence types we practised at school.

 

Monday 6th July 2020:

Today you will be adding more information to your volcano and earthquake booklet by focussing on a very famous volcano…can you think of any famous volcanoes?

…Have you heard of Mount Vesuvius?

 

Click on the links below to research some facts.

As you listen and read, have a pen and paper ready to make notes. It would be useful if you wrote your notes using the 5Ws and H for how…

What?

Where?

Who?

When?

Why?

How?

https://www.theschoolrun.com/homework-help/pompeii

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY_3ggKg0Bc

https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/history/pompeii/

https://kids.kiddle.co/Mount_Vesuvius

https://kidzfeed.com/mount-vesuvius-facts-for-kids/

 

There’s lots of research to get through today but if you did want to find out more then please Google “Mount Vesuvius”.

 

Once you have researched and made notes, please read back what you’ve written to check you understand your own notes. Do they make sense? Is there something you need more information about? Have you written something about:

What? What has happened with Mount Vesuvius? Make notes on events surrounding this famous volcano.

Where? Where is Mount Vesuvius? Simply writing “Italy” won’t do so please be specific.

Who? Who has Mount Vesuvius affected?

When? When did Mount Vesuvius erupt? Make notes about all dates you research, for example, can you find out the date of the earliest recorded eruption? The date of the most famous eruption? The date of the last or most recent eruption?

Why? Why is Mount Vesuvius so famous?

How? How did it cause such a lot of devastation? Be specific.

 

Tuesday 7th July 2020:

From yesterday’s notes you now need to organise your work and write them up neatly. This section about Mount Vesuvius will be added to your booklet along with the other neat pages you wrote last week.

 

How will you organise your writing about Mount Vesuvius? You could create subheadings such as:

Key Facts

Pompeii

Did you know?

You could also organise your information into chronological order. However you decide to organise your writing, you must decide on this before you write up your neat copy.

 

On your neat write up could you use pictures? Or a bold title? Could you underline your subheadings? Think about how your information page will be eye catching and well organised.

 

You could always highlight or underline key words or words that the reader needs to use the glossary for.

 

Look back at the link I left on Friday too to help you form a variety of sentence types. Aim to write in a varied and interesting way.

 

Wednesday 8th July 2020:

Today you will be researching more information to add to your volcano and earthquake booklet by focussing on famous earthquakes.

 

Click on the link below to research some facts.

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/earthquakes/famous.htm

As you read, have a pen and paper ready to make notes. It would be useful if you wrote your notes using the 5Ws and H for how…

What?

Where?

Who?

When?

Why?

How?

 

This time the link takes you to a page about various famous earthquakes rather than just one famous one in particular.

Your job is to either:

  1. choose one famous earthquake from the link and research it further

or

  1. make notes on a variety of famous earthquakes.

 

Either way, please make sure that your notes

cover the 5Ws and H for how.

 

 

 

Welcome to Anglesey Primary School...Parents and carers, you are invited to meet your child’s new teacher and collect your child’s report. Look in the ‘Covid-19 Parent Support‘ page and open the parents appointment letter. We look forward to seeing you all again.
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